Welcome to my PowerApps Function Reference (not exhaustive). PowerApps, in general, provide us with a quick and easy way to start developing an app without much effort. The power comes from the complex formulas that we can quickly build.

Contrary to other IDEs we can insert formulas anywhere with a combination of PowerApps functions, Signals (like Location), Enumerations (like Color) and Named Operators (like ThisItem) allowing to build quite complex UI changes quickly.

Below you can find the functions available until now separated into sections.


Reference

Jump to the section:


Conditional Functions

If

The If function tests if the first condition is met and returns the result. You can define an optional value when all conditions are false.

 

Switch

The Switch function evaluates a formula and tries to find it in the list of matches defined. It stops in the first match that validates the condition and returns the corresponding value or the default value if you provide one.

 

Text Functions

Text

The Text function is widely used in PowerApps and for a good reason. It converts any value to a text field to display. For numbers and dates, you can add additional parameters to format them according to any criteria.

 

Math Functions

RoundDown Function

The RoundDown function rounds a number to a specific number of decimal places, always to the nearest lower number.

 

RoundUp Function

The RoundUp function rounds a number to a specific number of decimal places, always to the nearest higher number.

 


Microsoft’s function reference is quite complete and should always be the place to check if you have any questions, but I want to provide more focused input.

For my PowerApps Function Reference, I want to focus on functions and provide additional information based on my experience. With this, I’ll save you time, by compiling things I find in forums, blogs, my projects, and Microsoft’s documentation in a simple reference.

I won’t be able to provide information for all PowerApps functions (that would be overkill and time consuming) so, I’ll focus on the most common ones.

If you don’t find one, please refer to the official Microsoft’s formula reference and get in touch. You can send me an email, interact on Twitter, or add a comment and, based on the demand; I can try to focus more on specific functions.

Finally, Microsoft tells us that ”If you know Excel, you know PowerApps. The model and formula language are the same.”, so if you’re an Excel expert, the formulas’ flow will look familiar and allow you to start quite quickly building your PowerApp.

More functions will come every Friday so don’t get discouraged for seeing only a few.

Featured Image by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

Manuel Gomes

I'm a Project Manager with experience in large projects and companies. I've worked in the past for companies like Bayer, Sybase (now SAP) and I'm currently working for Pestana Hotel Group.

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